Archive for the ‘public’ Tag

Thinking about the Front Yard Garden 2013   Leave a comment

The rains have begun late this year and because of this it has been a long and fruitful growing year for the front yard garden. The flowers from the squash and sungold cherry tomatoes were picked, the squash itself nurtured, all by neighbors unknown.

Food plants are meant to die back, drop their seed and nourish the soil as they go. All of this takes time, the garden is not always “pretty”, as the seasons work toward the plants end and the soil rests. Recently someone called the non emergency number in San Francisco to report that the front yard garden was a Danger- high priority. I could see as I took a look at the garden that it might be a bother to someone getting out of their car, not dangerous, but “definitely a bother.”

The front yard food garden is separated by a driveway that has a rose tree and other non food plants. The non food part of the garden touches my neighbors garden.  I garden their plot also. My neighbors got a letter about the front yard garden.  I had begged these neighbors I consider friends to be part of the city planting that was happening in the Mission District, and now they are displeased with me and the front yard garden. The letter we both got has not made them want to keep their front yard garden any more than they already did not want to have the front yard garden.  Before and after getting the letters the gardens were prettied up.

I plant and maintain these gardens for all of the folks that like finding free treasure, for folks with plenty and for folks with not enough.  There are millions of hungry people in the U.S.A. and this garden helps me feel better about that fact.

Another neighbor, a friend had told me to expect the letter.  This neighbor is one of the many gardeners in the front yard garden. He was a farmer in Mexico and has given me many garden tips. He said he had tried to explain fallow soil and why it was messy.  He said she did not understand.

I realize many do not know that plants are alive. Plants are alive.

Fukushima is Here at Ocean Beach, San Francisco, at the Pacific Ocean   Leave a comment

I wrote about a photo shoot that happened at Ocean Beach for a group art show I am curating, “WATER Currents in Contemporary Art”, opening May/2014.  I mentioned the corporate women’s run, but did not mention what I consider to be the most important thing going on at Ocean Beach in San Francisco’s (same place as my photo shoot), Outer Richmond District is a planned  massive gathering “Fukushima is Here”, tomorrow, Saturday 19, October 2013, same as the run.

BART is not running, “rightfully I believe”, so plan to take the bus or MUNI out to Ocean Beach, parking will be non existent.

I am imagining the mine blowing realization that the corporate workers will have when they realize Fukushima is Here!  What will the middle higher ups think? and the the higher higher ups? and their bosses?  Who will get blamed?

Many folks who have not thought of radiation all year will have had an unplanned for education. “Fukushima is Here”!

For more information go to http://www.Fukushimaishere.org

Big City Thoughts   Leave a comment

If you are accosted by a screaming po liceman continue walking  and do not respond. If you stop as I did, because you are afraid and behave without thinking as I did, ask if you are being detained. If you are not being detained (another word for arrested) continue walking and say nothing.  Do not speak with any po licemen, even if you witness an incident.  If you want to report an incident go to a po lice station.  If you want to report a po liceman in San Francisco there is paper work you can fill out and submit.

Big City Thinking 2013   Leave a comment

I was walking my dog, doing errands, minding my own business.

I dropped off a video for my friend at the Mission Library, on the corner of Bartlette and 24th Street. I noticed the construction going on in the immediate area.  I spent time really looking.  I noticed the purple building across the street being renovated, the  workmen on the 2nd floor noticed me.  I stayed a bit longer musing at the money being pumped into the area and then walked on. The area is becoming cleaner, more colorful, with newly painted buildings, new murals, gentrified by the corporation. A general feeling of wealth pervades. Long time businesses must be thrilled with the revitalization of their neighborhood and yet there is a look of poverty among many of the people.

I was thinking….. San Francisco is looking like a Real Big City and 24th and Mission is losing its look of a well used, accepting, even friendly, kind of homey, and homeless, chewing gum covered MUNI and 24th Street BART station Neighborhood. There are not the “usual characters”, some have died I realize, but the homeless that I knew, and that knew me, because I am also a character in this neighborhood are not there anymore.  The under served  are more and different people, and it feels like a less congruent neighborhood.

I have crossed the street and have passed Cafe La Boheme, a longtime business in the Mission District of San Francisco California. I am on the north side of the street, by the bench, on the curb, waiting for the light to change.

I am standing next to two Central American women, they are on my right and carry on a quiet conversation that I cannot hear. They are clearly not ‘with me’ and yet ‘we are together’ standing on the curb. I like this part of living in the City; together, yet not together. A black car with a blue and white flag hanging from its rearview mirror stops early, not passing through the yellow Mission Street light, waiting for us three and others I do not see. I acknowledge this gesture with a wave and we three women, step onto the road, from the curb, to cross with the light, legally.

Just as we step onto Mission Street an American po liceman, on a bike, in dark blue shorts, with very tanned legs, going east on 24th Street, turns left or north, onto Mission Street,  directly in front of us! He is unsafely close to us. He proceeds to ride his bike on the wrong side of the street, having barely missed us. I yell to him, “Hey! You almost hit us And you’re on the wrong side of the street!”  I say the And part as if it is underlined, in a tone that insinuates he does not know the bike rules and that I do.

I can see him out of the side of my eye, he is coming back for me.  I am scared. I say to the women, “I think he is coming for me” they agree that he is  “probably” coming for me. I edge closer to these women. They do not move away.  We keep walking. We are across the street.

I can feel and see his American po liceman anger as he reaches me on the sidewalk. I don’t see anyone but him now. I am facing north.  I am breathing fast. I don’t look away, avert my eyes. I do not remember seeing anything else going on around me. The American po liceman straddles his bike and begins to scream at me. He screams at me, in front of witnesses, he screams at me, that his excuse or reason  for breaking the rule of riding on the wrong side of the road is so that he can “sneak up on the bad guys”.  I swear he says “sneak up on the bad guys.” He screams at me to mind my own business! That he is doing his job! Though I initially stop walking, he does not impede my forward progress when I begin to walk on as he screams.

As I walk I tell him, ” I can still speak out. I hear my voice become quieter than I feel, is that because of my anger or my fear, I wonder? He must know I am afraid. I am ashamed, I think that I looked down, cowed by his rage.  I think, I don’t know. I think I have failed and averted my eyes. I am ashamed.  Does the The American po liceman ride off, because he realizes I am afraid? Does he ride into the cross walk and onto the wrong side of the road to show me he can?”

A 30 something African man tells me I did the correct thing, bolstering me. He reconnects me to the changing neighborhood and myself. I am still breathing fast. I speak with the man for a moment, encouraged by him. I appreciate his neighborliness. I walk to a cafe and tell my story to the young women working. They tell me they are not surprised by the American po licemans behavior and one of them wonders why it did not escalate.

I remind the young women that there were many witnesses and that I am perceived as a white woman, we acknowledge this truth. I wonder if  my ethnicity was more obvious or if I had been wearing a hoody if I would have been safe from serious retribution? I wonder if this American po licemans behavior is to teach the witnesses, as well as myself to not speak out, to not speak the truth?

Maps Only: Radical Cartography in Contemporary Art   Leave a comment

Widely attended in the Mission District, Maps Only was a wild success!

As the curator there were many successes for me personally; Artists sold their work and met lovers of their personal maps, there is no  greater compliment. Char Green’s “San Francisco in My Hair”, Fernando Marti’s “Mis Missiones” and Richard Keltner’s “Top of the Bay” all found new wall hooks and “Mission Possible: A Neighborhood Atlas”, a broadside of maps, have few left in this print run. I was thrilled to be asked to collaborate by a SOMA Gallery!

ART in pirate garb, Oliver Lowe regaled the huge and often crushing crowd, while many drank grog and were saved of scurvy, at the same time folks were educated by Deborah Sciales’, “Transmigration of Radiation: We All Live in Japan”. Brian Jones’ “Pistol Pop and Dada” gave us insight into British and U.S. Punk and is being considered by a serious collector.

“Lordrifa” and “True North”, performed their audio map to a room so full they were unable to move from their latitudinal and longitudinal locations.

Randy Figures met a woman who is following the progress of his map, “Aestos” a fantasy world map, in hopes of investing in “Aestos” in the book form.

“Relocation”was Take-Able and many were, thanks to Mary Brown and art is touchable thanks to Sarah Dorrance’s, “Infinite Possibilities”, dedicated to Helen Martin 1957-2012, Nellie Stine and my Grandmother Lucille Carter Merritt 1922-May 31st, 2012.

Maps Only: Radical Cartography in Contemporary Art opened May 26th and hangs until June 25th, 2012 and can be seen at Back to the Picture, The Latin American Gallery, 934 Valencia Street, San Francisco, California. Please come and be educated!

9 reject binary dualism   Leave a comment

Graffiti art on a solar powered electric meter, anonymously placed.

Maps Only: Radical Cartography in Contemporary Art 2012   9 comments

Maps Only: Radical Cartography in Contemporary Art, has been in the works for a year or so. The show opens at 7pm, on May 26th and hangs until June 25th, 2012, at Back to the Picture Latin American Gallery, 934 Valencia Street, between 20th and 21st Streets, in San Francisco’s Mission District.

Brian Jones work,  “Pistol Pop N Dada”  “A secret history tracing the development of what was to manifest itself as ‘punk graphics’ in late twentieth century Britain, back through Pop Art, John Heartfield and ultimately to Dada. The piece is based on the research that I did for an (as yet) unpublished book of the same title. It’s been in my head for years. I had always intended that there ought to a ‘map’ to accompany it, and sketched the rough idea, then put it aside to mature.”

Char Green, “San Francisco in My Hair”, “Our personal geography, the landscapes that surround us throughout out lives, shape who we are, in ways that reach to the very heart of who we are, leaving their indelible marks – their maps – upon us.”

Deborah Sciales, “Transmigration of Radiation: We all live in Japan.” “Radiation still leaks from the now-closed Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, where 100,000 people have been evacuated from a 12-mile no-go zone. The reactor involved was designed by the Southern California-based Rosemead utility, Edison, and foisted on the Japanese by the US government. This work is in no way reproachful of the Japanese people, but rather is a condemnation of US policies of nuclear imperialism as practiced internationally.”

Fernando Marti, “Mis Misiones.”  “My art explores the clash of the Third World in the heart of Empire, and the tension between inhabiting place and the urge to build something transformative.”

Heather Green, “Impact Study”, “In an environment that is rapidly transforming due to human impacts, something as simple as the far reaches of the ebbing tide or as complex as the interconnected and biodiverse forms exposed during its wake may go unnoticed. My projects and installations explore and pay homage to peripheral or even vanishing places and species whose delicate survival depends on our awareness of them. The majority of my work focuses on La Cholla, a small place near Puerto Peñasco in Sonora, Mexico, a place I have known my whole life. By focusing on a singular place my work aims to engender witness, wonder, and regard.
 Through a phenomenological investigation of counting, charting, collecting and displaying what is found in this region, I invite speculation about what can be known and what will remain unknowable, what can be seen and what will never be seen again.”

Mary Brown, “Relocation”, ” The map “Relocation” reflects my interest in take-able public art, treasure maps, and underlying historical layers.”

Oliver Lowe, “Legend of Lost Rumbullion,”,    “It is the Age of Reason, and Science heralds the foreshortening of the World. As Empirical and Scientific expeditions proliferate, defining and quantifying the Known (and Unknown) Worlds, more and more the Fantastic and the Fabled are forced to recede into the Realm of Mythos.

Randy Figures, “Aestos”, one section of a mythical map that has been in the works for years and is being shown for the first time in the Maps Only show.

The Reverend Lordrifa, “True North”: A Consecration of Polar Dimensions”  an audio map in 5  dimensional space, with images of Holy Sites projected onto coordinates. The Reverend’s band, “True North” will film and interview the artists after their audio performance, another part of their performance.

Richard Keltner, “Another House”  and ” Top of the Bay”, a man of few words, “my preferred medium is pastels.”

Sarah Dorrance, “Infinite Possibilities”, deals with issues of permanence.